Reproductive & Sexual Health

Student Health & Counseling strives to provide quality health care and wellness services in an environment that is non-judgemental and respectful of each individual as well as his or her privacy. Our staff strives to be sensitive to the issues of those who may be sexually active.

SHCS provides consultation, evaluation, treatment, as well as educational and support resources to promote optimal health.

  • Men's Health

    SHCS provides care and treatment of health concerns unique to being male. Our providers work to provide our patients with a supportive, confidential and non-judgmental environment in where they can ask questions and discuss concerns.

    Available Services for Men’s Health:
    • • Evaluation and treatment for sexual health issues
    • • Check-up, diagnosis and treatment of sexually transmitted infections and diseases*
    • • HIV Testing
    • • Support in maintaining sexual health
    • • Support and assistance for concerns relating to sexual function or performance
    • • Support and assistance for concerns relating to sexual orientation
    • • Information about testicular self exams
    • • Routine age-specific laboratory testing
    • • Blood pressure screening
    • • Review of medication
    • • Information about diet and exercise
    • *Important information on STD screening: A urine test is a simple, but reliable way of detecting infections of the urethra in men. To do this, you must not urinate for at lease three hours prior to giving your specimen, and it is important that only the initial 10cc (marked on the container) of your stream be collected.
  • Women's Health

    Student Health & Counseling provides confidential information, examinations, and treatment, and information regarding all women's health issues. Our staff includes physicians and nurse practitioners who specialize in women's health.

    Available Services for Women’s Health:
    • • Evaluation and treatment for sexual health issues
    • • Check-up, diagnosis and treatment of sexually transmitted infections and diseases*
    • • HIV Testing
    • • Support in maintaining sexual health
    • • Support and assistance for concerns relating to sexual function or performance
    • • Support and assistance for concerns relating to sexual orientation
    • • Information about testicular self exams
    • • Routine age-specific laboratory testing
    • • Blood pressure screening
    • • Review of medication
    • • Information about diet and exercise
    • *Important information on STD screening: A urine test is a simple, but reliable way of detecting infections of the urethra in men. To do this, you must not urinate for at lease three hours prior to giving your specimen, and it is important that only the initial 10cc (marked on the container) of your stream be collected.
    • Emergency Contraceptions

      SHCS offers Plan B at a discounted price of $23.00 for students and enrollees. To inquire about Plan B, please walk-in to SHCS. Plan B, the "morning after pill", may be used after having unprotected sex to guard against unwanted pregnancy.  Plan B works better the sooner you use it and needs to be taken within 72 hours of unprotected intercourse or contraceptive failure. For more information on Plan B, see Plan B Frequently Asked Questions.

    • Contraception Counseling

      The affordability, availability, efficacy, and safety of contraception has greatly benefited women's health. With the many different forms of birth control available to women today, the decision about which type is best suited for an individual woman can be confusing and dependent on on many variables, including past medical history, ease of use, incidence of side effects, cost and risks. Our providers are specialists in all forms of contraception and can offer advice as to which option may be the best for you. Schedule an appointment with a provider by calling 415-476-1281 or by visiting myhealthrecord.ucsf.edu.
    • Pregnancy Testing & Counseling

       
    • Routine Gynecological Exams, PAP Smears and STI Screening

      Annual PAP exams may be done at SHCS or you may choose an OB-GYN once every 12 months provided you notify Student Health. Notification is necessary to ensure your visit will be paid by Anthem.

  • Contraception

    • Male & Female Condoms

      SHCS offers 'male' condoms at a discounted price of $2.00 for a dozen or $5.00 for three dozen.

      SHCS offers 'female' condoms (FC2) for free while supplies last. 

      Stop by either the Parnassus or Mission Bay clinic to purchase.

    • Birth Control Pills

      SHCS providers prescribe birth control pills for new and existing prescriptions. For a new prescription, schedule an appointment with your SHSC primary care provider. To transfer an existing prescription, walk into SHCS with your existing script and consult with a nurse. In addition, Orthocyclen, Orthotricyclen and Orthotricylen Lo are available at SHCS for a discounted price of $8.00.

      » Refill Requests: Orthocyclen, Othotricyclen and Orthotricyclen Lo refill requests can be made through the MyHealthRecord website. Requests made by 2 pm are ready for pick-up the next day.

      NOTE: Changes in current prescriptions or new prescriptions cannot be issued using e-mail as a provider appointment is necessary.

    • IUSs (Formerly known as IUDs)

      SHCS providers are trained to both counsel and place a Mirena IUS for patients.

      An IUS is a small device shaped like a “T”. Your health care provider places it in your uterus during an office visit.

      There are three IUSs available in the US: Paraguard, Skyla, and Mirena. The Paraguard IUS contains copper and is efective for up to 10 years. The copper in this IUS inhibits the functions of the sperm. Mirena and Skyla contain a progestin hormone, levonorgrestrel. The Skyla is effective for 3 years, Mirena for 5 years. Progestin changes the cervical mucus and the lining of the uterus, inhibiting sperm entrance and movement into the uterus or fallopian tube. The Mirena may also be prescribed to control heavy periods for women who do not need contreception. Mirena and Skylia do not contain estrogen. For some women a contraceptive without estrogen is important. All 3 IUSs are equally effective for contraception.

       All IUSs have a thin string attached at the base of the “T”. This allows your health care provider to remove the IUS in the office and you to check to make sure the IUS is in your uterus.

      IUSs are as effective as tubal ligations (getting your tubes tied) – but unlike a tubal ligation an IUS is completely reversible, and more effective than birth control pills. Annually, less than one IUS user in a hundred gets pregnant. Once the IUS is placed, there is nothing you have to do to make it work. Once inserted, you and your partner should not feel it. The Mirena IUS has the added benefits of decreasing menstrual cramps and anemia.

      Once an IUS is removed you can become pregnant immediately so if you do not desire pregnancy you must use birth control after removal.

      To inquire about an IUS placement, please call SHCS at (415) 476-1281 and schedule an appointment.

    • Diaphragm

      Schedule an appointment with a SHCS provider to learn more and/or be fit for a diaphram.

  • Sexually Transmitted Infections (STIs)

    • GONORRHEA

      Where: Moist areas; cervix, uterus, fallopian tubes, throat, mouth, & anus
      Risk: Sexual contact with an infected partner; Untreated can cause Pelvic Inflammatory Disease
      Symptoms: Men: white, yellow, green discharge, painful testicles;
      Females: unusual discharge, painful urination
      Treatment: Antibiotics
      Prevention: Informed choices between partners; Consistent use of latex condoms
      More info can be found here.

    • CHLAMYDIA

      Risk: Any sexual activity with an infected person; Known as the silent infection because most don’t know they have it & in women it can cause Pelvic Inflammatory Disease
      Symptoms: Abnormal discharge
      Treatment: Antibiotics
      Prevention: Informed choices between partners; Consistent use of latex condoms
      More info can be found here.

    • SYPHILLIS

      Risk: Person to person by direct contact with syphilis sores mainly on the genitals, vagina, anus, or in the rectum
      Symptoms: 1° stage: a single sore lasting 3-6 wks;
      2° stage: rough, red/brown rash on palms or soles of feet; rashes, sores of mouth, vagina, or anus; Latent: no symptoms;
      Late stage: damage of internal organs
      Treatment: Antibiotics
      Prevention: Informed choices between partners; Consistent use of latex condoms
      More info can be found here.

    • HIV

      What: HIV is the Human Immunodeficiency Virus. It is the virus that can lead to acquired immune deficiency syndrome, or AIDS. Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome , or AIDS, is the late stage of HIV infection, when a person’s immune system is severely damaged and has difficulty fighting diseases and certain cancers. With the advent of “highly-active” drug combinations, people can live much longer - even decades - with HIV before they develop AIDS
      Risk: HIV is spread primarily by: • Not using a condom when having sex with a person who has HIV
      • Having multiple sex partners or the presence of other sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) can increase the risk of infection during sex
      • Sharing needles, syringes, rinse water, or other equipment used to prepare illicit drugs for injection.
      • Being born to an infected mother—HIV can be passed from mother to child during pregnancy, birth, or breast-feeding.
      Symptoms: Within a few weeks of being infected with HIV, some people develop flu-like symptoms that last for a week or two, but others have no symptoms at all.
      Treatment: Obtain medical treatment immediately if you think you were exposed to HIV. HIV medications can prevent infection if they are started quickly. If you’ve been diagnosed w/ HIV, continue on your prescribed treament plan and check in with your provider regularly.
      Prevention: Because the most common ways HIV is transmitted is through anal or vaginal sex or sharing drug injection equipment with a person infected with HIV, know your status and the status of your partner. Everyone between the ages of 13 and 64 should be tested for HIV at least once. If you are at increased risk for HIV, you should be tested for HIV at least once a year; Limit your number of sex partners or be in a long-term mutually monogamous relationship with an uninfected partner. The fewer partners you have, the less likely you are to encounter someone who is infected with HIV or another STD; Correct and consistent condom use. Latex condoms are highly effective at preventing transmission of HIV and some other sexually transmitted diseases.“Natural” or lambskin condoms do not provide sufficient protection against HIV infection.; Do not inject drugs. If you do inject drugs, do not share needles and use clean needles and works
      More info can be found here.

    • HERPES

      What: Transmitted by herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) or type 2 (HSV-2). 1 in 6 people have a form of herpes
      Risk: Sexual contact (oral or genital) with an infected partner
      Symptoms: Most have no symptoms; Sometimes one or more painful sores around genitals, rectum, or mouth that take 2-4 weeks to heal
      Treatment: Herpes cannot be cured, but you can take antiviral medication to reduce symptoms of sores
      Prevention: Informed choices between partners; Consistent use of latex condoms
      More info can be found here.

    • HPV

      Risk: Person to person by direct genital contact
      Symptoms: Genital Warts: Small bump or group of bumps, raised or flat, or shaped like cauliflower.
      Cervical Cancers: No symptoms until it’s in advanced stages.
      Treatment: No treatment for virus, but are for health problems associated w/ HPV
      Prevention: HPV Vaccines for females & males ages 13-26 years old can lower the chances of getting HPV; Regular screening for women; Informed choices between partners; Consistent use of latex condoms
      More info can be found here.

    • TRICHOMONIASIS

      What: Caused by infection with a protozoan parasite called trichmonas vaginalis
      Risk: Sexual contact with an infected partner
      Symptoms: Men may be carriers, but women are more likely to show symptoms. Symptoms may range from mild irritation to severe inflammation of vagina between 5-28 days after exposure
      Treatment: Trichomoniasis can be cured with a single dose of prescription antibiotic medication (either metronidazole or tinidazole)
      Prevention: Informed choices between partners; Consistent use of latex condoms
      More info can be found here.

  • Sexual Debut

     
  • Sexual Consent

    The University of California is committed to creating and maintaining a community where all persons who participate in University programs and activities can work andlearn together in an atmosphere free of all forms of harassment, exploitation, orintimidation. Every member of the University community should be aware that the University prohibits sexual harassment and sexual violence, and that such behavior violates both law and University policy. The University will respond promptly and effectively to reports of sexual harassment and sexual violence, and will take appropriate action to prevent, to correct, and when necessary, to discipline behavior that violates this policy on Sexual Harassment and Sexual Violence This policy applies to all University employees and students.This Policy applies to the University of California campuses, the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, the Medical Centers, and the Office of the President, and allauxiliary University locations

    Consent, as referenced in this context, means:

    1. 1. Consent is informed. Consent consists of an affirmative, conscious decision by each participant to engage in mutually agreed-upon sexual activity. Consent to some form of sexual activity does not imply consent to other formsof sexual activity. 
    2. 2. Consent is voluntary. It is given without coercion, force, threats, orintimidation; - it is a positive cooperation in the act or expression of intent to engage in the act pursuant to an exercise of free will.
    3. 3. Consent is given when the person is not impaired or incapacitated. A personcannot consent if s/he is unconscious or coming in and out of consciousness. A person cannot consent if s/he is under the threat of violence, bodily injury orother forms of coercion, or has a mental disorder, developmental disability, orphysical disability that would impair his/her understanding of the act.
      1. (a) Incapacitation is the physical and/or mental inability to make informed, rational judgments. States of incapacitation include, but are not limited to unconsciousness, sleep and blackouts.
      2. (b) Where alcohol or drugs are involved, incapacitation is distinct from drunkenness or intoxication, and is defined with respect to how the alcohol or other drugs consumed impacts a person’s decision-making capacity, awareness of consequences, and ability to make fully informed judgments. The factors to be considered include whether the accused knew, or a reasonable person in the position of the accused should have known, that the complainant was impaired or incapacitated
    • Sexual Harassment

      Sexual Harassment is unwelcome sexual advances, requests for sexual favors, andother verbal, nonverbal, or physical conduct of a sexual nature, when submission to orrejection of this conduct explicitly or implicitly affects a person’s employment oreducation, unreasonably interferes with a person’s work or educational performance, orcreates an intimidating, hostile or offensive working or learning environment. Sexual harassment includes sexual violence. In the interest of preventing sexual harassment and sexual violence, the University will respond to reports of any such conduct.

      Sexual harassment may include incidents between any members of the University community, including faculty and other academic appointees, staff, coaches, residentsand interns, students, student employees (when acting within the course and scope ofemployment), and non-student or non-employee participants in University programs,such as vendors, contractors, visitors, and patients. Sexual harassment may occur in hierarchical relationships or between peers, or between persons of the same sex oropposite sex. In determining whether the reported conduct constitutes sexual harassment, consideration shall be given to the record of the conduct as a whole and tothe totality of the circumstances, including the context in which the conduct occurred.

      Consistent with the University of California Policies Applying to Campus Activities,Organizations, and Students, Policy 100.00 on Student Conduct and Discipline, Section102.09, harassment of one student by another is defined as unwelcome conduct of asexual nature that is so severe and/or pervasive, and objectively offensive, and that so substantially impairs a person’s access to University programs or activities that the person is effectively denied equal access to the University’s resources and opportunities.

    • Sexual Violence

      Sexual Violence is defined as physical sexual acts perpetrated against a person’s willor where a person is incapable of giving consent. This includes: sexual assault, rape,battery, and sexual coercion; domestic violence; dating violence; and stalking.

      1. 1. Domestic Violence is defined as abuse committed against an adult or aminor who is a spouse or former spouse, cohabitant or former cohabitant, orsomeone with whom the abuser has had a child or is having or has had adating or engagement relationship.
      2. 2. Dating Violence is defined as abuse committed by a person who is or has been in a social relationship of a romantic or intimate nature with the victim.
      3. 3. Sexual Assault occurs when physical sexual activity is intentionally engaged in without the consent of the other person. The conduct may include physical force, violence, threat, or intimidation; ignoring the objections of the other person; causing the other person’s intoxication or impairment through the use of drugs or alcohol; taking advantage of the other person’s incapacitation(including voluntary intoxication), state of intimidation, or other inability to consent.
      4. 4. Stalking is behavior in which a person repeatedly engages in a course of conduct directed at another specific person, that places that person in reasonable fear of his or her safety or the safety of a third person or persons.
  • Fertility